Gerard Butler Tried To Come For Ryan Reynolds And The Emphasis Is On Tried

Please come forward if you’ve witnessed Gerard Butler secretly watching the very underrated rom-com “Definitely, Maybe” on an airplane flight, because he’s claiming not to watch Ryan Reynolds movies full stop.

Despite the two stars being essentially interchangeable in many of their on-screen roles, the Scottish actor chose to come for Reynolds this week, pulling a Mariah “I don’t know her” Carey kind of stunt so petty that we can’t help but admire.

Responding to a question about the similarities between his 2009 box office bomb “Gamer” and Reynolds’ recent blockbuster “Free Guy” ― both films take place within the world of a video game, in case you really haven’t seen either ― Butler threw some expert-level shade his fellow actor’s way.

“I actually don’t know what ‘Free Guy’ is,” he said during an interview with Unilad about his new movie “Copshop,” before his co-star Alexis Louder explained that it’s Reynolds’ new film.

“Oh shit, is it?,” Butler continued. “I don’t watch Ryan Reynolds movies.”

It only took a few days before the very online Reynolds directed the energy he usually expends trolling Hugh Jackman or his own wife, Blake Lively, Butler’s way. 

“Can you believe Gerard Butler doesn’t know what Free Guy is?” Reynolds wrote on Instagram Tuesday, alongside a screenshot of a headline about the actor’s recent comments on his Twitter timeline.

But, ultimately, Reynolds hoped to direct fans’ attention to a different story, circling his own tweet about his recent partnership with the ACLU and the NAACP, which just so happened to fall below the news item.

“Also, can you believe that the challenges to democracy have never been greater, and that Blake and I will match your contributions to the @aclu_nationwide and @naacp_ldf?” he continued in the caption. “*Order of these questions optimized for the Internet, NOT importance.”

Earlier this week, Reynolds and Lively announced they will match donations up to $1 million through Oct. 1 as part of the “Democracy Building Challenge,” splitting the funds between the American Civil Liberties Union and the NAACP’s Legal Defense Fund.

Butler has yet to respond to Reynolds’ social media maneuvering, but at this point, his only real option is to pony up and post a receipt of his donation to the couple’s cause.

Giving Reynolds a taste of his own medicine and helping preserve our very fragile democracy? Your move, Butler.

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